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Criaterra Makes Construction Environmentally Friendly

Adital Ela, CEO and co-founder of Criaterra (Facebook)

Criaterra is an Israeli firm that makes construction materials that can help with all of the world’s problems with climate change and waste disposal. It does so by creating sustainable building materials that can actually be reused, instead of just being thrown away and filing up space in garbage dumps. And they are made from natural components.

This is especially important these days considering all of the problems that the world is currently suffering through due to the effects of climate change. Just this past summer, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the United Nations body for assessing the science related to climate change, released a stunning report on how the world is getting hotter, how climate change is destroying the environment, and how this has all been caused by human activity.

The new report cited the work of many scientists and showed that world temperatures are at their highest since 125,000 years ago. Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are at the highest level in 2 million years.

Israel’s Minister of Environmental Protection Tamar Zandberg responded immediately to the report saying “Israel has begun necessary actions, but it is imperative to declare a climate emergency, define climate disasters as a strategic threat on the threat map and prepare accordingly.” Zandberg has pushed Israel’s new government to implement new laws to limit carbon emissions in the country.

CRIATERRA is committed to developing construction products that meet the strictest criteria for regenerative products with properties that adhere to, and exceed building material standards. We have proven that greening the building supply chain is attainable with our wall tiles.

So, leave it to Israel, Startup Nation, to find the solution, or solutions, to climate change. Israeli startups are coming up with ways to provide drinking water out of the humidity in the atmosphere, harness solar power to reduce greenhouse emissions, and the development of green buildings which not only absorb heat and light for energy but reduce the need for air conditioning with external gardens that shield the interior from heat while eating up excess CO2 from the air.

Just one example of this is Anai Green, an Israeli inventor who, in September, was named one of the winners of this year’s Women4Climate Tech Challenge for her new green tech called Lumiweave. Lumiweave creates solar powered fabric.

Lumiweave not only provides shade during the day, but uses the solar energy collected to provide light at night. This will help with the effects of climate change by both cutting down on the need for more energy for air conditioning but also using the Sun for light at night.

So what, exactly, does Criterra do?

How often do you see some building or house on the street undergoing renovations? It could even be just one office in a building. Then you see all of the materials removed that are being replaced: sinks, pipes, cabinets, drywall leftover, and so on and so forth. All that stuff then needs to be processed through waste disposal and dumped in a landfill.

But what if that did not need to be the case? What if tiles, brocks, roofing materials, etc. could all be reused? That would save or environment from further pollution from waste, as well as a great deal of energy.

Criaterra boasts that it creates genuinely pure eco-innovative materials that embody the vision of a circular economy. It points out that the construction industry is one of the main sources of pollution in the world.

Unlike ceramics or cement in which natural resources are burnt to become dead matter, Criaterra says that its eco-innovative manufacturing process creates “compacted ‘living’ products that may return to earth as nutrients towards their next productive cycle.”

Pure eco-innovative composite materials as strong as concrete allow the mass production of constructive elements as well as interior products. Criaterra’s uses a variety of earths and vegetal fibers for its 100% natural blend collection.

is achieved through a compacting process of, creating a rich and luscious color palette that brings a rare organic sense and scent to every product.

Criterra was selected for funding from the European Innovation Council (EIC) Accelerator and the Israel Innovation Authority.

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