The Science Behind DogTV

Posted By Jewish Business News Correspondent On Monday, February 4th, 2013 With 0 Comments

According to the entrepreneurs behind the business, the programs on DogTV are based on the results of about 60 studies related to vision, hearing, music, and colors that dogs see and love.

Exposure

Play and playback of sounds and picture at the age of eight weeks can significantly reduce stress and anxiety in dogs. (Source: Exposure to video images between three and five weeks of age decreases neophobia in domestic dogs, ” Jolanda Pluijmakers, David Appleby, Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, UK.)

Use of Video

  1.  “Using video can be an effective tool for learning the content and visual impact on animal behavior.”  (Source: Can video images imitate real stimuli in animal behavior experiments?” Richard B. D’eath, 1997, University of Oxford, UK.)
  1. “Video content can help animals in understanding the movement, space and form.” (Source: Colour perception and the use of video playback experiments in animal behaviour”, Leo Fleisman, William McClintock, University Of California, 1997.)
  1. “Dogs’ gaze following is tuned to human communicative signals.” (Source: 2012, Erno Teglas, CentralEuropeanUniversity, Budapest, Hungary.)
  1. “Dogs’ behavior in kennel is influenced by visual content on TV.” (Source: “The Influence of visual stimulation on the behaviour of dogs housed in a rescue shelter, ” L Graham, DL Wells, 2005 Queen’s University, Belfast, UK.)
  1. “Dogs visually notice moving objects much better than static objects.” (Source: “The Influence of visual stimulation on the behaviour of dogs housed in a rescue shelter, ” L Graham, DL Wells, , 2005  Queen’s University, Belfast, UK.)
  2. “Dog owners ordered their dogs to perform with signals transmitted through TV screen and their responses were only slightly better than under normal conditions.” (Source: “Successful application of video projected human images for signaling to dogs, ” Peter Pongracz, 2003, University of Budapest.)
  3. “Sound commands only, without the use of a visual picture, had only a minor effect on the dog’s performance.”  (Source:ibid.)

Hearing, Music & Sound

  1. “Seventy percent of anxieties in dogs were reduced when they listened to relaxing piano music.” (Source: “Bioacoustic reseach & development, ” Joshua Leeds, Lisa Spector.)
  2. “Exposure of dogs to different types of noise may not only reduce their noise phobias but also their fear of abandonment.” (Source: Frequency of nonspecific clinical signs in dogs with separation anxiety, thunderstorm phobia and noise phobia, alone or in combination”, 2001, Karen Overall, AVMA.)

10. “Music therapy is an excellent option to reduce anxiety, heartbeat rate and high blood pressure.”  (Source: MonashUniversity ”Relaxing music prevents stress”, Wendy Knight, 2001.)

Endnotes

  1.  “The behaviour of kennelled dogs is influenced by visual stimulation in the form of television programmes.” (“The Influence of visual stimulation on the behaviour of dogs housed in a rescue shelter”, L Graham, DL Wells, 2005, Queen’s University, Belfast, UK.)
  2.  “Stimulations of features of the environment presented before eight weeks might reduce subsequent fear and anxiety” (“Exposure to video images between three and five weeks of age decreases neophobia in domestic dogs”, Jolanda Pluijmakers, David Appleby, Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, UK.)
  3. “Owners could command their dogs to obey simple tasts via the video projector, and the dogs’ overall performance was only slightly poorer in this condition than in the real situation” (“Successful application of video projected human images for signaling to dogs”, Peter Pongracz, 2003, University of Budapest.)
  4. “Vision in Dogs, ” Miller & Murphy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1995.
  5. Through a Dog’s Ear, ” Leeds & Spector, 2005.
  6.  “Color Vision in the Dog, ” Jay Neitz, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1989.
  7.  “The influence of auditory stimulation on dogs”, D L Wells, Queen’s University, Belfast, 2002

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