Jason Schwartzman’s ‘Mozart in the Jungle’ to Air on Amazon

"Listen Up Philip" Portraits - 2014 Sundance Film Festival

Jason Schwartzman, the son of Talia Shire, nephew of Francis Ford Coppola and successful actor/director in his own right has a new dramedy coming to the Internet. His “Mozart in the Jungle” will be available for live streaming on Amazon Instant Prime staring on December 23d.

All ten episodes will be released at the same time in keeping with the new custom for Internet based original programming. This will make people who enjoy binge watching television happy.

A premiere was held for the new show this week which Schwartzman is co-producing with his also successful cousin Roman Coppola. The series is based on oboist Blair Tindall’s memoir that follows a regime change at the New York Symphony.

At the premiere Schwartzman, who also wrote the music, said “Growing up, I always loved classical music, but I felt very intimidated by it — this was an opportunity to learn. Roman Coppola told The Hollywood Reporter, “Jason and I grew up in a family that’s always put a large appreciation on music, ” citing their great-uncle Anton Coppola, a famous opera conductor and composer who attended the premiere.

Malcolm McDowell, who plays the outgoing symphony conductor, told The Hollywood Reporter, “If we can bring in some young people to listen to classical music, we’ve done our job. … When I did A Clockwork Orange, Beethoven was never so popular. So if we can do the same for classical music that Clockwork did for Beethoven, it would be fantastic.”

The show also stars Saffron Burrows, Bernadette Peters, and Gael Garcia Bernal as “Rodrigo” a fictionalized version of conductor Gustavo Dudame. Paul Weitz and John Strauss are also producers.

The Guardian seems to think that the show is an example of something that is so bad that it is fun to watch saying, “On its own terms, Mozart in the Jungle is a slightly awkward comedy-drama that may or may not have audiences hooked when it becomes a full-scale show. But as a revelation of what producers, directors, and studios think that classical music is, it’s fascinating. And as a caricature and parody of hype around Dudamel and the all-too prevalent myths of the maestros, it’s both hilarious and depressing, sharing only the hair and the intense stare with anything approaching the reality of what life’s like as a hard-working conductor or orchestral musician.”



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